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Book Review



We should not have to become experts in the field of abandonment, but we are. We should not have to become versed in FBIS transmissions, but we do. We should not have to become versed in DoD Message Center Traffic, but we do. We should not have to become versed in NSA radio intercepts of enemy traffic, but we do. We should not have to become scholars of the testimony given to the Select Committee on PoW/MIA Affairs, but we have. We should not have to understand the intricacies of satellite imagery analysis, but we have. We should not have to understand the differences of certainty ratings of the NPIC, but we have.

Because if we do not become experts in the field of abandonment, versed in FBIS transmissions or DoD Message Traffic or NSA Radio intercepts of enemy traffic, or scholars of the testimony given to the Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs, or understand the intricacies of satellite imagery analysis or understand the differences of certainty ratings of the NPIC, then the Defense POW/MIA Office will be able to debunk any and all information pertaining to the survival of Americans abandoned or the cooperation of SE Asian countries on the repatriation of remains of American servicemen.

That is their job. They sound much better at it than we do. They have had an abundance of practice at it. They can devote huge resources to spin control, while we must live within our meager budgets. This is where you commit yourself to education. The following is a list of books that should be read in order for you to understand exactly what has transpired. These books show how our servicemen and some civilians were abandoned after the US pullout of Vietnam.



Tiger Cage
Tiger Cage
An Untold Story
D.E. Bordenkircher as told to
S.A. Bordenkircher
Abby Publishing
ISBN 0-9661771-4-2
Library of Congress 97-93396
Copyright © 1998 by S.A. Bordenkircher


Con Son Island, a South Vietnamese penal colony in the South China Sea is the major setting for this book which highlights the total betrayal of American efforts in Vietnam by Americans from home.

Don Bordenkircher, a Corrections Department professional was hired in 1967 from the administrative ranks of San Quentin Prison by the United States Agency for International Development - Office of Public Safety, (USAID/OPS), as Senior Advisor to the South Vietnamese Director of Corrections and his forty-one correctional centers. One of which was Con Son Island. He would spend the next five years in this capacity. His mission was simple: Teach the South Vietnamese how to operate a humane correctional program and it would send a message to the North which may have reciprocated by treating our POWs humanely.

While the mission statement may have been simple, the mission was not- -and this was not due to South Vietnamese resistance toward humane treatment of prisoners.

William Colby, Tom Harkin, Don Luce and the world press, especially the American press, all play a major part in betraying the true US effort and one must wonder if power, greed or 15 minutes of fame were the culprits. This book may not be about American Prisoners of War, but yet it is as much about them as it is about betrayal. For in the end, there is the factor that if South Vietnam treated its incercerated poorly, then North Vietnam would retaliate.

For a more detailed review, click on the jacket of the book.



Code Name Bright LightCode Name Bright Light
The Untold Story
of U.S. POW Rescue Efforts
During the Vietnam War
George J. Veith
The Free Press
a div. of Simon & Schuster, Inc.
ISBN 0-684-83514-2
Copyright © 1998 by George J. Veith

When one thinks of American Rescue attempts during the Vietnam War, the immediate picture of the Son Tay raid comes to mind. Jay Veith painstakingly details the many efforts of the US Military to rescue US Prisoners of War during the Vietnam War.

From MACV-SOG to the advent of the Joint Personnel Recovery Center through the frustrations of non cooperation from the US Ambassador to Laos to the interservice rivalries to the withholding of intelligence by the Central Intelligence Agency.

This book will reveal the culprits behind the POW/MIA issue as well as some heros who truly tried to do everything within their power to captialize on intelligence and effect the rescue of Americans held captive.

Veith also touches upon something that the PoW/MIA Forum together with the Northwest Veterans Newsletter are exploring: Were the Communist Vietnamese informed of US war effort operations, including attempts to rescue American POWs, before the fact? Toward the end of this book Veith tells us that in excess of 200 POWs were moved just prior to one such rescue attempt.

For a more detailed review, click on the jacket of the book.




Why Didn't You Get Me Out?
Why Didn't You Get Me Out?

Frank Anton, with Tommy Denton

The Summit Publishing Group, Arlington TX

ISBN 1-56530-251-6


Copyright © 1997 The Summit Publishing Group

This is one of the most powerful books that has ever come out! The author, Frank Anton, is a former POW who was held in the jungle POW camps in South Vietnam. Yes, South Vietnam. Warrant Officer Anton was on a routine chopper mission in January of 1968 when he was shot down. What followed was a little over 5 years of hell.

Frank has drawn renderings of the five POW jungle camps that he was held in, and these renderings are in his book. This book could easily have been named, "Hidden In Plain Sight," because these jungle POW camps were within miles of US firebases and/or camps!

Anton was incarcerated with Bobby Garwood, the Marine Pfc. who returned to the United States in 1979. While Frank does not paint a flattering picture of Garwood, he has stated that he does not view Garwood as either a traitor or a hero--he views Bobby as a victim.

Anton's debrief was the longest of any returned Prisoner of War, (6 days), and the debrief revealed more about US intelligence on Prisoners of War during their captivity then you could imagine.

The book is a fast read and